Music Games

A Pioneer Flight Into The Souls of Sound: Celebrating Amplitude

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by T.J. Denzer March 24, 2016 @ 12:01 PM
Harmonix
These days, when we look at industry of music and rhythm games, it’s hard not to think of Harmonix. The development studio has been a master force and pioneer of the genre for over a decade with its work on the Guitar Hero, Rock Band and Dance Central franchises. However, there was time when Harmonix was still figuring it out and had a long ways to go. This initially led to the creation of a game called FreQuency and when the game garnered positive attention, but not commercial success, they attempted to fine tune it with better gameplay mechanics and a better soundtrack. The result would be Amplitude, and it hit shelves on this day back in 2003.

Amplitude Review (PlayStation 4)

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by Jon Ledford January 4, 2016 @ 11:01 AM
Harmonix
The plastic peripheral-slinging music game developers at Harmonix have returned to their roots with a modern remake of Amplitude. This 2003 hit was a sequel to the studio's first game, Frequency. After a very successful Kickstarter campaign last year, Harmonix was finally able to get this revamped version of Amplitude up and running in order to give its now broader fan base a taste of what things were like when they were just starting out. Likewise, fans who may have played Amplitude and Frequency during their original runs on the PlayStation 2 (including myself) will have something relatively different and new to enjoy as they soak up all that nostalgia. Best of all, it's nice trip back in time to the later days of the PaRappa the Rapper and Bust a Groove era, when music games didn't focus on having a pricey instrument replica in your hand and just focused on getting your rhythm down and matching notes.

Guitar Hero Live Review (PlayStation 4)

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by Luke Brown October 28, 2015 @ 1:01 PM
Freestyle Games
For a time, the rhythm game genre was flush with games vying for your attention. While it could be argued there was a bit of oversaturation in the marketplace, the disappearance of these peripheral-based games happened so suddenly, it was as if they never existed at all. Then a funny thing happened. Somewhere out in the ether, the idea for a resurgence took hold. It was as if someone shouted from the rooftops, "Let there be (virtual) rock!" Freestyle Games answered the call for Activision, and the Guitar Hero franchise was never the same. In fact, it was better than it ever was.

Rock Band 4 Review (Xbox One)

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by Luke Brown October 5, 2015 @ 10:23 AM
Harmonix
Five years after the last full retail release, Harmonix has returned with Rock Band 4. Like your favorite band that's been out of the studio for too long, Harmonix's return is a welcome one. Who better than the masters of the genre to bring back one of the most storied franchises of the last decade for another run at greatness? With new platforms and audiences to reach, the time seemed right for Rock Band to once again make a claim to the throne of the ultimate music franchise. Much of what makes up Rock Band 4 will be immediately familiar to longtime players, but that's not a bad thing. Rock Band 4 brings back feelings you didn't even know you were missing, and improves upon the formula just enough to make everything feel fresh and new, while being as comfortable as a pair of worn-in leather pants.

Persona 4 Dancing All Night Review (PS Vita)

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by Luke Brown September 22, 2015 @ 11:01 AM
Atlus
If you thought taking the characters of a fan-favorite role-playing game and throwing them into a fighting game was as drastic a departure for the Persona series as was humanly possible, Persona 4 Dancing All Night proves otherwise. Combining the beloved grind-fest RPG with a rhythm game takes Atlus' outside-the-box thinking to a whole new level. All the characters you've spent hundreds of hours with over the course of the past few years return again, only this time they've set their sights on saving the world through the universal language of dance. It shouldn't work. Persona 4 Dancing All Night is probably the largest deviation from the core concept a franchise has ever received, yet somehow, it manages to be everything fans could possibly have hoped for.