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Oxenfree Review (Xbox One)

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by Luke Brown January 15, 2016 @ 11:07 AM
Night School Studio
Every school had its weird class traditions or secret spots where teens gathered to socialize away from the rest of the world. Doing something dumb, like sneaking onto a closed beach, with your friends before you graduated is a time-honored tradition. Every school also had its weird myths and rumors about the local area, too. Maybe you had that house that was haunted, or a place in the woods where you could hear strange sounds under the perfect conditions. Oxenfree takes those elements and mixes them together to create a wild, dangerous night for a small group of friends. With a mystery that grows stranger and stronger the deeper you dive and characters that are instantly relatable, Night School Studio delivers a first effort that's spooky, sincere and enthralling.

10 Funniest Fallout 4 Glitches

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by T.J. Denzer January 14, 2016 @ 2:01 PM
Bethesda
These glitches are the tip-top of the topsy turvy technical flaws in Fallout 4. You may have seen them or you may have been lucky (or unlucky depending on how you look at it) enough to slip through the game without ever laying your eyes on these magnificent spectacles. These are the 10 Funniest Fallout 4 Glitches.

That Dragon, Cancer Review (PC)

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by T.J. Denzer January 14, 2016 @ 11:01 AM
Numinous Games
We know a mature game by the things that rating systems tell us. Mature, PEGI 18, etc. These are labels defined by mostly surface things: blood and gore, suggestive themes, language and the like. But any child can see blood. Any child can hear bad language. Conversely, That Dragon, Cancer doesn’t have any of those things. Yet it may be the most mature thing I’ve ever experienced. It’s an invite to walk beside a family through the deepest waters of hope, despair, faith, humanity, loneliness, togetherness, joy, and sadness. You can’t give this to a child. You can’t expect someone to grasp this episode without the strength, patience and awareness to see, hear and feel what is meant to be conveyed. For my experience, it was almost perfect.

Amplitude Review (PlayStation 4)

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by Jon Ledford January 4, 2016 @ 11:01 AM
Harmonix
The plastic peripheral-slinging music game developers at Harmonix have returned to their roots with a modern remake of Amplitude. This 2003 hit was a sequel to the studio's first game, Frequency. After a very successful Kickstarter campaign last year, Harmonix was finally able to get this revamped version of Amplitude up and running in order to give its now broader fan base a taste of what things were like when they were just starting out. Likewise, fans who may have played Amplitude and Frequency during their original runs on the PlayStation 2 (including myself) will have something relatively different and new to enjoy as they soak up all that nostalgia. Best of all, it's nice trip back in time to the later days of the PaRappa the Rapper and Bust a Groove era, when music games didn't focus on having a pricey instrument replica in your hand and just focused on getting your rhythm down and matching notes.